Abstract

Simulation of flow and transport in petroleum reservoirs involves solving coupled systems of advection diffusion-reaction equations with nonlinear flux functions, diffusion coefficients, and reactions/wells. It is important to develop numerical schemes that can approximate all three processes at once, and to high order, so that the physics can be well resolved. In this paper, we propose an approach based on high order, finite volume, implicit, Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (iWENO) schemes. The resulting schemes are locally mass conservative and, being implicit, suited to systems of advection-diffusion reaction equations. Moreover, our approach gives unconditionally L-stable schemes for smooth solutions to the linear advection-diffusion-reaction equation in the sense of a von Neumann stability analysis. To illustrate our approach, we develop a third order iWENO scheme for the saturation equation of two-phase flow in porous media in two space dimensions. The keys to high order accuracy are to use WENO reconstruction in space (which handles shocks and steep fronts) combined with a two-stage Radau-IIA Runge-Kutta time integrator. The saturation is approximated by its averages over the mesh elements at the current time level and at two future time levels; therefore, the scheme uses two unknowns per grid block per variable, independent of the spatial dimension. This makes the scheme fairly computationally efficient, both because reconstructions make use of local information that can fit in cache memory, and because the global system has about as small a number of degrees of freedom as possible. The scheme is relatively simple to implement, high order accurate, maintains local mass conservation, applies to general computational meshes, and appears to be robust. Preliminary computational tests show the potential of the scheme to handle advection-diffusion-reaction processes on meshes of quadrilateral gridblocks, and to do so to high order accuracy using relatively long time steps. The new scheme can be viewed as a generalization of standard cell-centered finite volume (or finite difference) methods. It achieves high order in both space and time, and it incorporates WENO slope limiting.

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