This paper was prepared for the Gas Industry Symposium of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of AIME, to be held in Omaha, Nebr., May 21–22, 1970. Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Illustrations may not be copied. The abstract should contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon request to the Editor of the appropriate journal provided agreement to give proper credit is made. provided agreement to give proper credit is made. Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers Office. Such discussion may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Abstract

A primary consideration of an engineer in the selection or design of a gas processing unit is its capacity and its processing unit is its capacity and its sales volume. If only one source of gas of a uniform composition is available, the input parameters to the unit are fixed within very narrow limits. However, if two or more sources are commingling the gas supplied to the unit, then the designer is forced with the difficult decision of ascertaining the correct input parameters to use as design criteria. The authors of this paper found that the use of the principles of uncertainty would give the best engineering estimate to this latter case.

To illustrate the use of uncertainty techniques for this application, the authors' wrote a Fortran IV Computer program utilizing the Monte Carlo method. Several hypothetical problems are presented and solved. problems are presented and solved. In each example, the classical approach or using a straight volumetric calculation gave values for the acid gas composition which, if used without modification, would have resulted in an underdesigned unit. In each of the examples investigated the acid gas composition for each supply source was allowed to follow a normal distribution in order to compare the differences involved in this particular assumption.

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