Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers office. Such discussions may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Introduction

The Oklahoma Panhandle has produced major amounts of gas for 50 years. Initial production came from shallow rocks of Permian production came from shallow rocks of Permian age the Herington, Krider and Winfield porous limestones located on the northwest flank of the Anadarko basin.

Beginning in the early 1950's, additional reserves of gas have been proved in the Panhandle from deeper horizons in Pennsylvanian Panhandle from deeper horizons in Pennsylvanian and Mississippian age rocks. Of these newer horizons, the Morrow sands are by far the most important, followed in importance by the Chester (Mississippian), then the Hoover, Tonkawa and Topeka in approximate equal proportions. This newer production has added significant reserves to the earlier reserves, making the Oklahoma Panhandle a major segment of the Panhandle a major segment of the Amarillo-Hugoton gas field.

REGIONAL GEOLOGY

The subsurface structure at the base of the Pennsylvanian system of rocks across the Oklahoma Panhandle is illustrated in Fig. 1. In Cimarron County, the western of the three Panhandle counties, depths to the Panhandle counties, depths to the pre-Pennsylvanian sequence of rocks average about pre-Pennsylvanian sequence of rocks average about 1,000 ft below sea level. Much of this county is not well recognized because of the lack of well control. Recent tests near Boise City are expected to provide additional information. Keyes Dome is situated within the closing contour in the northeastern corner of the county.

Across Texas County, the middle county, subsurface elevations range from 1,000 to 4,000 ft below sea level. Most of this difference in elevation is related to the prominent faults along the western county line. prominent faults along the western county line. East of these faults the shelf area of the Anadarko basin dips fairly uniformly backward.

Beaver County, the eastern county, lies on the hinge line between the shelf area of Texas County and the steep basin flank that drops southeastward into the Anadarko basin trough. In the basin, each formation is expected to be found in full or maximum thickness. Moving out of the basin, past the hinge line and onto the shelf, each individual formation becomes thinner either by onlap or by erosion. Along the hinge line, environmental conditions are in optimal development for the deposition of porous/Permeable beds. Thus, Beaver County contains a large number of multiple stratigraphic pinch-outs or traps, any of which are potential reservoir beds, and hence capable of becoming a producing field.

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