Abstract

Ever-increasing utilization of fossil fuels to meet the energy requirements of our affluent society has resulted in an alarmingly high rate of pollutants being emitted to the atmosphere. Although the problem of air pollution has been existent since the earliest pollution has been existent since the earliest times, its magnitude had not been discernable. In recent years, however, this subject has attracted the attention of both the public and the Government. Of the various sources of air pollution, the internal combustion engine has been estimated to contribute about 60% to the overall problem. Since 80% of the fuel requirements for the transportation sector of our economy is shared by vehicles, mostly automobiles, buses, and trucks, the use of an alternate, nonpolluting fuel, would certainly diminish air pollution levels. Research along this direction at Oklahoma State University has resulted in the development of an internal combustion engine which uses hydrogen instead of gasoline as fuel. Unless a more viable solution to the air pollution problem is advanced, it is proposed that the oil industry consider the development of a total Energy Management System which, interalia, aims at supplying large quantities of hydrogen at relatively low cost. It is believed that the proposed system would enable optimum management proposed system would enable optimum management of energy resources and thus place minimum strain on the delicate ecological balance of the environment.

Introduction

It may seem paradoxical, but man is presently poisoning his own environment, thus presently poisoning his own environment, thus gradually disturbing the delicate ecological natural balance. Millions of tons of noxious pollutants are rejected daily to the atmosphere, pollutants are rejected daily to the atmosphere, rivers and lakes, in the United States, as a result of the utilization of some 65.5 × 10(15) is BTU of energy, as reported for 1969. In a sense environmental pollution has become a direct corollary to an ever-increasing level of energy utilization. It all began with the Industrial Revolution and, since then, the increase in energy consumption has shown a linear correlation with the increase in economic growth of the United States reflecting a gradually rising standard of living.

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