1-13 of 13 Search Results for

5.7.2 Recovery factors

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.2118/9781613993170-05
EISBN: 978-1-61399-884-7
... preferentially into the higher permability sections and lower permability sections are bypassed. Fig. 5.4 Oil and water wetting of formation particles ( Abdallah et al. 2007 ). Thomas (2008) and Lake (2010) describe two very important factors that can control recovery of some of this residual...
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.2118/9781613994948
EISBN: 978-1-61399-894-6
Book Chapter
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.2118/9781613994948-05
EISBN: 978-1-61399-894-6
.... This chapter introduces the principles of mobility control applicable to the development of enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) processes. Mobility control is essential to the effectiveness of such processes as micellar/polymer flooding and offers much potential to improve the effectiveness of other processes...
Proceedings Papers

Paper presented at the Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, August 6–8, 2007
Paper Number: SPE-111897-MS
..., in $/Mscf would be 2.56, 2.98, 3.41, and 3.83 given cost recovery factors of 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%, respectively. Model 2 This model assumes that the price of gas is proportional to the price of the Brent crude oil, as given by Eq. A1 . Based on this model, the gas price would be $1.30/Mscf...
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.2118/9781555630874
EISBN: 978-1-61399-927-1
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.2118/9781613993040
EISBN: 978-1-61399-882-3
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2019
DOI: 10.2118/9781613997192
EISBN: 978-1-61399-904-2
Book Chapter
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.2118/9781613993170-06
EISBN: 978-1-61399-884-7
... site and at the mix plant. H 2 S may come from the well either because of FeS reacting with an acid or because of released well fluids. CO 2 could come from the well or from the treating equipment as part of a foam job, “energized” fluid treatment, or an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) treatment. This gas...
Book Chapter
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.2118/9781613993170-04
EISBN: 978-1-61399-884-7
... of the hydrocarbon. However, because of marginal rock-matrix quality, these reservoirs generally require both natural and induced fracture networks to enable economic recovery of the hydrocarbon. Rock types in this class include shale and coalbed methane (CBM). He notes that the term shale is a catchall for any rock...
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.2118/9781555630737
EISBN: 978-1-61399-924-0
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.2118/9781613994962
EISBN: 978-1-61399-893-9
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.2118/9781555632076
EISBN: 978-1-61399-951-6
Book
Book Cover Image
Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers
Published: 01 January 1979
DOI: 10.2118/9781613999646
EISBN: 978-1-61399-964-6

Product(s) added to cart

Close Modal