Because of its many advantages, including safety, accuracy, and instantaneity, closed-chamber drill stem testing continues to gain popularity as a well testing technique. popularity as a well testing technique. Although commonly performed, closed-chamber tests typically require manual reading of pressure gauges and manual recording of pressure gauges and manual recording of data.

This paper will describe a computerized system for automatic collection and analysis of closed-chamber test data. Using an IBM-compatible micro-computer and newly developed correlations, the system calculates maximum surface pressures vs. time for pure gas, gas-saturated water and gas-free water influx and displays the curves on the computer's screen. During the test, it reads from any of up to three pressure transducers, records the surface pressures and instantaneously displays them on the pretest planning graph. Following the test, it calculates flow rates for assumed pure gas and pure water flow and, as requested, plots pressure or either of the two rates versus time.

In addition to the computerized system for acquiring the data, the paper will describe and diagram the manifolding system for measuring the surface pressures. The manifolding system was designed to (1) enable pressures to be read from any of a set of pressures to be read from any of a set of three transducers, (2) keep the transducers in a relatively safe area away from the rig floor, (3) tap the chamber's surface pressure at the control head instead of at the floor choke manifold, thereby eliminating chicksan hoses and swings and the accompanying potential for pressure leakage, and (4) allow potential for pressure leakage, and (4) allow components to be removed relatively easily for servicing.

In summary, the paper will describe (1) the computerized system for acquiring closed-chamber DST data, (2) the enhanced and newly developed correlations and (3) the transducer manifolding designed for these tests. Diagrams of the manifolding and examples of tests will illustrate the paper.

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