American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Inc.

This paper was prepared for the Rocky Mountain Regional Meeting of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of AIME, to be held in Denver, Colo., April 7–9, 1975. Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Illustrations may not be copied. The abstract should contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon request to the Editor of the appropriate journal provided agreement to give proper credit is made. provided agreement to give proper credit is made. Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers office. Such discussion may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Abstract

Natural water drive reservoirs, normally considered quite efficient, have not been subjected to extensive oil recovery improvement studies or field tests. Lately, however, special treatments to control the producing water to oil ratios in Tensleep sand and Arbuckle Dolomite have shown good payouts. These results are presented payouts. These results are presented in the form of time-rate production graphs and cost performance tables.

Conclusions are:

  1. Ultimate oil recovery from natural water drive reservoirs can be improved by chemical treatments to reduce water-oil ratios.

  2. New in situ polyacrylamide gelling techniques provide an effective degree of control over subsurface water movement.

  3. Chemical oil recovery costs under $.95/bbl can be expected for natural water drive limestone reservoirs.

Introduction

Three factors — higher crude oil prices, better technology and lower prices, better technology and lower treatment costs — have been combined to assure excellent payouts from producing wells treatments designed to producing wells treatments designed to lower water-oil ratios in natural water drive reservoirs. This paper studies the effect of each factor on a group of Arbuckle "control" wells in the Graham-Rooks County area of northwest Kansas (Fig. No. 1). Treatment of a Tensleep sand producer in Hot Springs County, Wyoming, is also summarized to show that good economics can be expected under a variety of reservoir rock and fluid conditions.

ARBUCKLE DOLOMITE — GEOLOGY AND PRODUCING CHARACTERISTICS PRODUCING CHARACTERISTICSAn important subsurface feature in central Kansas is the Barton Arch — a buried ridge of Precambrian granite running northwest-southeast. Above this basal granite lies the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Dolomite, the principal oil producing zone in central Kansas.

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