Abstract

This paper presents a case history of the Ford Geraldine (Delaware Sand) Unit waterflood operation located in Culberson and Reeves Counties, Texas. The Unit, operated by Continental oil Company, is presently under waterflood in the Delaware presently under waterflood in the Delaware Sand. Presented is a discussion of injection pattern selection, injection well interval pattern selection, injection well interval control and monitoring, injected water quality control and, finally, use of reservoir models in prediction and performance matching.

Extensive water injection well work has been performed consisting of running injection profiles on most wells and remedial jobs on wells with poor injection distribution to alter injection profiles and improve vertical sweep efficiency. Injected water quality control is unique in that Pecos River water is used, which necessitates oxygen and bacteria treating in addition to the removal of solids by filtration. Three computer reservoir simulation model studies have been run to match performance, to date, and to assist in selection of infill well locations.

Specifically, the significance of the Ford Geraldine (Delaware Sand) Unit waterflood is that it is one of the very few successful waterfloods in the Delaware Sand. Field data, lab data, and computer modeling work will be presented in the discussion.

Introduction

The Geraldine-Ford Field is located in extreme northern Reeves and northeastern Culberson Counties, Texas. Refer to Fig. 1. Development began with the discovery by Ford Chapman, of the G. E. Ramsey No. 1, in April 1956, and has continued to date. Production from the Geraldine-Ford Field is from the Bell Canyon Formation of the Delaware Mountain Group at an average depth of 2680 feet. There are two producing Bell Canyon Sand members in this reservoir. The Ramsey, or upper, Zone is the principal producing sand body and the Olds, or lower, Zone has been found to have productive potential throughout a large portion of the potential throughout a large portion of the field. The Ramsey Zone is considered the better waterflood prospect due to its greater areal extent and more favorable porosity, permeability, and oil porosity, permeability, and oil saturation.

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