Abstract

The ability to perform such services as Production Logging and Perforating are now available on Slickline. With Today's technology any number of operations can be achieved more cost effectively and with greater ease than ever before. Comparison with Fiber Optic and Electric Line has proven that the expected results will rival those of real time logging.

Introduction

Economic concerns spawn an inherent problem of how to continue to use desirable services without paying premium prices but retaining quality results.

Certain services are and remain critical to retain efficient well operations. Some of these services call for the use of Flowmeters, Gamma Ray, Collar Locators, Fluid Identification Tools, Pressure and Temperature Tools and perforating equipment. By utilizing slickline to convey these services, substantial saving can be realized in direct job cost as well as through logistic efficiencies.

It will be the purpose of this paper to introduce key aspects of these slickline conveyed services and the methodology of memory logging and perforating.

Statement of Theory

As in any logging process the purpose of slickline conveyed service is to obtain pertinent data relevant to an area of interest. All sensors are calibrated to converge on a pinpoint location in the target area. We must keep in mind that all conventional logging principals apply in the memory mode just as they do in real time mode.

Certain conditions may render Slickline Electronic Services not feasible for use in a candidate well. These conditions may include, but are not limited to, very high deviation, unacceptable distance between downhole benchmark and target, and the inability for the log to match the tubing detail or an open hole log.

Description and Application of Equipment and Process
Gamma Ray, Temperature, Capacitance and Collar Locator (Fig. 1)

An array of sensors referred to as the Downhole Memory Gamma Logger is the heart of the Memory Production Logging system.

Utilizing a Scintillation detector for sensitivity and accuracy, logging of zones is accomplished in much the same way as with electric line. This sensor is vital to establish correlation with an existing log.

Borehole Temperature, for the tool described in this paper, is obtained by means of a Platinum Resistance Temperature Detector which is not a saturation type probe but a relatively quick response unit. With resolution of .04 degrees Fahrenheit and accuracy of plus or minus 2 degrees Fahrenheit, this sensor is a very important component of the logging string.

The capacitance probe, used in conjunction with other sensors accomplishes the identification of water and oil.

A passive collar locator, when combined with the Gamma Ray Tool and the Electronic Depth Counter, allows positive depth control.

Flowmeter (Fig. 2)

The bi-directional Flowmeter discussed in this paper is built at a pitch of three inches, a diameter of one inch and a resolution of twelve counts per revolution and records downhole flow rates. This tool is extremely useful in pinpointing the presence and exact depth of flow.

Pressure (Fig. 3)

With a resolution of .01 psi and an accuracy of plus or minus .05% of full scale, the pressure tool is a vital and versatile part of the logging string. Pressure readings are corrected by means of a tool internal Platinum RTD for accuracy.

Gamma Ray, Temperature, Capacitance and Collar Locator (Fig. 1)

An array of sensors referred to as the Downhole Memory Gamma Logger is the heart of the Memory Production Logging system.

Utilizing a Scintillation detector for sensitivity and accuracy, logging of zones is accomplished in much the same way as with electric line. This sensor is vital to establish correlation with an existing log.

Borehole Temperature, for the tool described in this paper, is obtained by means of a Platinum Resistance Temperature Detector which is not a saturation type probe but a relatively quick response unit. With resolution of .04 degrees Fahrenheit and accuracy of plus or minus 2 degrees Fahrenheit, this sensor is a very important component of the logging string.

The capacitance probe, used in conjunction with other sensors accomplishes the identification of water and oil.

A passive collar locator, when combined with the Gamma Ray Tool and the Electronic Depth Counter, allows positive depth control.

Flowmeter (Fig. 2)

The bi-directional Flowmeter discussed in this paper is built at a pitch of three inches, a diameter of one inch and a resolution of twelve counts per revolution and records downhole flow rates. This tool is extremely useful in pinpointing the presence and exact depth of flow.

Pressure (Fig. 3)

With a resolution of .01 psi and an accuracy of plus or minus .05% of full scale, the pressure tool is a vital and versatile part of the logging string. Pressure readings are corrected by means of a tool internal Platinum RTD for accuracy.

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