Abstract

This paper will discuss today's platform automation requirements and how they differ from 1980 designs. As we move into the 1990's in common with downstream activities the design of platform operations are being examined from a total platform operations are being examined from a total life cost and not purely from the traditional capex/opex point of view. The platform automation pyramid is discussed, containing safety, regulatory, pyramid is discussed, containing safety, regulatory, audit analysis and management information system requirements. The paper emphasizes the need for a totally integrated approach to platform automation systems and highlights the benefits gained.

Introduction

During the 1980's there has been a strong push to fully automate platform operations, process push to fully automate platform operations, process control, Sub-Sea, Emergency shutdown, Fire and Gas and other sub systems, and many operational benefits have been enjoyed, such as central control room operations and access to the required data. However, the true cost of maintaining these systems are now becoming realised. Often, the systems both hardware and software were custom to the project, making long term maintenance extremely project, making long term maintenance extremely difficult and costly. The systems were generally interfaced to the other systems, requiring multiple databases between the systems, with no time synchronisation. Subsequent event analysis is thus extremely difficult. 1980 designs tended to individually focus on the requirements of each platform control subsystem rather than the broader platform control subsystem rather than the broader integrated management, safety and control requirements.

1990's platform automation systems are focused on the total platform needs, such as fully integrating the management, safety and process control systems. Failure to view the requirements from a top down perspective can result in difficult and costly operation of the platform. Before specifying the platform control requirements operations management must analyse their specific needs. When these needs are known a total solution can then be implemented, tailored to their needs.

1980 PLATFORM AUTOMATION SYSTEMS

Figure 1 illustrates a typical 1980's large platform automation system. Typically the system platform automation system. Typically the system comprised of the following:-

Process control system.

Emergency Shutdown system.

Fire and Gas system.

Subsea control.

Fiscal metering. (not shown)

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