This paper was prepared for the Second Midwest Oil and Gas Industry Symposium of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of AIME, to be held in Indianapolis, Ind., March 28–29, 1974. Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Illustrations may not be copied. The abstract should contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon request to the Editor of the appropriate journal provided agreement to give proper credit is made.

Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers office. Such discussion may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Abstract

Michigan's northern and newest oil play cuts across an area largely devoted to timber propagation and recreational activities. The wilderness and scenic attributes of the area are valuable assets for tourism and year-around recreation, the regions major industry. The freeway system has put the region within a few hours drive from the congested urban areas of southern Michigan, thus increasing the demands put upon public land usage.

The development of oil and gas resources in northern Michigan, much of it on public lands highly valued for recreational activity, began at a time when environmental issues were coming to the fore. Concerns for the protection of the wild, or natural, conditions protection of the wild, or natural, conditions of this environmentally-sensitive region necessitated closer controls over well sites, access and product removal. Unfortunate oilfield mishaps further increased citizen and government concern. Zoning of certain areas against drilling is designed to protect waters, wildlife habitat and to preserve aesthetics.

Michigan's basic law governing the development of oil and gas resources has been strengthened. Policies and concepts of public land use have been restated in terms of public land use have been restated in terms of best use and management of public lands. Added safeguards for environmental protection have not been detrimental to exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Michigan.

Introduction

Michigan's northern and newest oil- and gas exploration play cuts across an area largely devoted to timber propagation and recreational activities. The drilling activity extends in a band across the northern part of the Southern Peninsula where all the part of the Southern Peninsula where all the states oil and gas fields are located. This northern region has long been known for its scenic and recreational attributes, particularly the coastal parts of Lakes Huron and particularly the coastal parts of Lakes Huron and Michigan which at this time limit the east-west spread of oil exploration.

In 1846 William Cullen Bryant, American poet and journalist wrote: "I spoke in one poet and journalist wrote: "I spoke in one of TV former letters of the manifest fate of mackinaw, which is to be a watering-place. I cannot see how it is to escape this destiny.

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