American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Inc.

This paper was prepared for the Regional Gas Technology Symposium of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of AIME, to be held in Omaha, Neb., Sept. 12–13, 1968. Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Illustrations may not be copied. The abstract should contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon request to the PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon request to the Editor of the appropriate journal provided agreement to give proper credit is made.

Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers office. Such discussion may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Abstract

The concentration of ultra-deep well completions in the Ellenberger formation of West Texas' Delaware Basin present a unique opportunity to study the state of the deep well stimulation art.

Some 125 wells, many 20,000 feet and deeper, have been completed in the past several years, and each of these wells has been stimulated to some extent. A wide variety of completion techniques and stimulation methods have been used to cope with the extreme depth, temperature, and gross pay thickness of these wells.

At one time, effective stimulation was considered almost impossible in the Ellenberger, but with improved materials and techniques developed specifically for the Ellenberger, better results are being realized. With measurable stimulation results to work from, treatment design has begun to conform to established tenets, except on a much larger scale.

These results can be further improved by adapting to more powerful and effective hydraulic programs, and with better hydraulics, the use of programs, and with better hydraulics, the use of proppants to supplement what has heretofore been proppants to supplement what has heretofore been acid fracturing.

Introduction

The Ellenberger formation of West Texas'Delaware Basin presents an unparalled opportunity to study ultra-deep well stimulation design. The concentrated amount of drilling, and the diversity of completion techniques afford sufficient number of well histories to make generalized summaries meaningful. Much of the experience gathered in the Ellenberger will be directly applicable to deep carbonate reservoirs in other areas, and to deep well stimulation in general.

Since the discovery of commercial gas production in the Ellenberger, approximately production in the Ellenberger, approximately 125 wells have been completed in eight fields of the Delaware Basin. Each of these wells has been stimulated to some extent, and many have been treated quite heavily.

This content is only available via PDF.