The paper was presented at the SPE/DOE Unconventional Gas Recovery Symposium of the Society of Petroleum Engineers held in Pittsburgh, PA, May 16-18, 1982. The material is subject to correction by the author. Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Write: 6200 N. Central Expwy., Dallas, TX 75206.

Abstract

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has established, as part of its research program, the Gas Resource Information System (GRIS). GRIS is a computerized data base that contains historical data on eastern gas shale wells. GRIS was established at the request of industry and contains all those elements which industry feels are important for the evaluation of drilling, completion, stimulation and production techniques for eastern gas shale wells. While GRI will be researching the data on the base to optimize production from the eastern gas shales, it will make GRIS available to industry as a mutually beneficial tool. GRI intends to cooperate with industry in updating and maintaining the data base. Through industry's cooperation in providing input into the data base, it is felt that sufficient data will be available so that the data base can be effectively utilized to optimize techniques for attacking the eastern gas shales as a valuable production target and as a consequence both the producer and rate payer can benefit from the availability of more gas into producer and rate payer can benefit from the availability of more gas into the pipeline. While the data base will not answer all problems, its use as demonstrated in the study case can be of prime importance in sorting out those factors that can be used to develop optimum techniques to maximize gas production from the eastern gas shales.

Introduction

Currently, wide gaps exist in the data necessary to address the technology problems that must be overcome if the eastern gas shales are to be an attractive target to industry. Understanding the problems with this resource, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is planning to narrow these gaps by the creation of the GRI/Industry Data Base for the eastern gas shales. Many of the producers in the Appalachian Basin are small independents who do not have the resources or are unwilling to risk them in exploration plays with which they are not familiar. However, there even exists some plays with which they are not familiar. However, there even exists some hesitation on the part of the larger producers who cannot justify large exploration and operation commitments when so little is known about the effectiveness of current stimulation techniques. Major constraints to commercial exploration of the eastern gas shales are the uncertainty of the location of the optimum resource, the identification of the most effective extraction techniques and the subsequent economics of extraction. In order to increase activity in the eastern gas shales and consequently enhance production from this resource, it is necessary to:

  1. Identify the optimum plays;

  2. Establish the most effective completion, stimulation and production technologies; and

  3. Establish generic production models.

The Gas Resource Information system (GRIS) sponsored by production models. The Gas Resource Information system (GRIS) sponsored by GRI is designed to aid the producers in all these areas.

Gas Resource Information System (GRIS)

The major obstacle to the development of the eastern gas shales is the low rate of gas production. Even though shale wells produce for long times, the initial low rate of production significantly impacts economic considerations. Development of effective completion and stimulation techniques with the goal of maximizing production from the resource would result in a favorable economic situation. To accomplish this, considerable amounts of information must be studied and reviewed. The Gas Resource Information System (GRIS) is a tool for evaluating the applications of new technologies and the improvement of current techniques. It is also useful in confirming regional production analysis. GRIS is an aid for maximizing gas production from the eastern gas shales.

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