The focus of this work is the behavior of gas viscosity and gas density for hydrocarbon gas mixtures. The viscosity of hydro-carbon gases is a function of pressure, temperature, density, and molecular weight, while the gas density is a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular weight. This work presents new approaches for the prediction of gas viscosity and gas density for hydrocarbon gases over practical ranges of pressure, temperature and composition. These correlations can be used for any hydrocarbon gas production or transportation operations.

In this work we created an extensive database of measured gas viscosity and gas density (>5000 points for gas viscosity and >8000 points for gas density). This database was used to evaluate existing models for gas viscosity and gas density. In this work we provide new models for gas density and gas viscosity, as well as optimization of existing models using this database.

The objectives of this research are:

  • To create a large-scale database of measured gas viscosity and gas density data which contains all of the in-formation required to establish the applicability of various models for gas density and gas viscosity over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.

  • To evaluate a number of existing models for gas viscosity and gas density.

  • To develop new models for gas viscosity and gas density using our research database — these models are proposed, validated, and presented graphically.

For this study, we created a large-scale database of gas properties using existing sources available in the literature. Our data-base includes: composition, viscosity, density, temperature, pressure, pseudoreduced properties and the gas compressibility factor. We use this database to evaluate the applicability of the existing models used to estimate hydrocarbon gas viscosity and gas density (or more specifically, the z-factor). Finally, we provide new models and calculation procedures for estimating hydrocarbon gas viscosity and we also provide new optimizations of the existing equations-of-state (EOS) typically used for the calculation of the gas z-factor.

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