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Abstract

With the introduction of reasonably-priced 386-based, co-processed, multi-meg. hard drive laptops occuring at the same time ASCII formatted log data became available in the field from logging companies, the ability of the company geologist or engineer to quickly analyze this data themselves, while in the field, became possible.

Basically the CSA program takes a spreadsheet with all pertinent formulas, macros, settings (print, database and communications) and compiles these templates into runtime applications. The advantages of this system are in both the mechanical aspect (where the compiled program will run many times faster than the original; will utilize co-processor and expanded memory support; and will support virtual memory by using the system hard drive as temporary storage when all available RAM has been exhausted), and the programming aspect (where all formulae, macros and settings can be easily tailored to customer criteria and then become secure and unmodifiable).

Once the templates have been compiled into a CSA runtime application, they may be legally run without the need of the original spreadsheet software or the resulting royalties.

Introduction

Most of the current log analysis programs that are commercially available are not suited for use on laptop computers. This is usually due to the size of the program itself or the programs hardware requirements, not to mention the licensing agreement which usually limits the number of stations that can legally be running the software package. The CSA program circumvents both of these package. The CSA program circumvents both of these problem areas. The program itself places only minimal problem areas. The program itself places only minimal requirements on the actual hardware in place, those being PC/ MS-DOS 2.0 or higher, a minimum of 512K RAM (640K is recommended) and a hard disk drive. A math co-processor is not required, but applications and systems that use 8087, 80287 and 80387 coprocessors can be supported and indeed offer greatly increased performance in terms of speed of recalculation and thus throughput.

Generation of a CSA program begins by analyzing your spreadsheet template and compiling all formulae and macros into machine language. A runtime "engine" is then created using all of the spreadsheet environments and functions that you wish to include in the compiled version, such as communication settings (if you are using a modem from the field), print and graph settings (if you have a portable printer), or word processing and database features portable printer), or word processing and database features (if you wish to generate field summaries and descriptions). Additional macro functions, not supported by the original spreadsheet software, can be written and included. These user-defined functions (UDF) are written in "C" programming language and include such items as screen colors, programming language and include such items as screen colors, messages, custom pull-down menus, keyboard control functions and other higher level functions not usually found in a normal spreadsheet environment.

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