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Abstract

The present energy crisis has renewed interest in the deep potential of the Appalachian basin. This paper briefly reviews Ohio's deep activity and suggests that the deep potential of Ohio has only been partially potential of Ohio has only been partially evaluated. k brief review of some of the evidence that seems to indicate the presence of substantial deep hydrocarbons in Ohio is presented along with a challenge to industry to presented along with a challenge to industry to economically evaluate and develop the deep potential. potential

Introduction

The present energy crisis has renewed interest in the deep potential of the Appalachian basin. There is room for giant fields in the deep section; however, the r s is high and the initial cost is expensive.

The purpose of this paper is to e briefly the deep activity, (2) suggest that possibly the deep potential of Ohio has only possibly the deep potential of Ohio has only been partially evaluated, (3) review briefly the available evidence that seems to indicate the possible presence of substantial deep hydro carbon reserves in Ohio and (4) challenge industry to economically evaluate and develop the deep potential of Ohio.

REGIONAL REVIEW

The "deep" section of Ohio to be discussed is located between the Cambrian-Ordovician unconformity and pre-Cambrian basement. This section has been termed the Sauk sequence. Ohio does not have outcrops of this section where standardized terminology could be derived. For convenience, the Sauk sequence will be subdivided into the upper predominantly carbonate section and the lower predominantly clastic section (Fig. 1).

Regionally, Ohio is located near the center of a large geologic province that is outlined by pre-Cambrian outcrops. These outcrops consist pre-Cambrian outcrops. These outcrops consist of the Canadian shield on the north, the Adirondak and Appalachian Mountains on the east and southeast, with the Ozark uplift on the west and the Wisconsin shield on the northwest.

This large area is divided by structural features into three basins: the Michigan basin on the north, Illinois basin on the west and the Appalachian basin on the east and southeast. Ohio is essentially located on the west flank of the Appalachian basin, but also has small areas that are included on the flanks of the other basins.

In order to understand better the deep potential of Ohio, a broad general understanding potential of Ohio, a broad general understanding of the over-all area is needed.

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