Abstract

This paper summarizes a project that was part of the $40 million 2006-2010 Joint Implementation of Vapour Extraction (JIVE) pilot program managed by the Petroleum Technology Research Centre and including Husky Oil, CNRL, NEXEN, Alberta Innovates–Technology Futures, and the Saskatchewan Research Council. The project was in support of a cyclic solvent injection (CSI) field pilot in the Lloydminster region of Saskatchewan that was evaluating the potential of CSI to exploit reservoirs following cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS).

History matches were performed for two Edam CHOPS wells in the Colony formation and they determined initial reservoir conditions (e.g. pressure, effective permeability, porosity, fluid saturations, and gas and oil phase mole fractions) for subsequent CSI simulations. Thin formation layers (~15 cm) were used in the CHOPS simulations to improve representation of wormhole generation and advance. One well had rapid sand production that quickly declined whereas the other well had continuous sand production due to wormhole propagation and scouring and resulted in sustained oil production.

The reservoir model for the application of CSI contained a number of wells including the CSI well and two communicating offset wells (Figure 1). Using an Alberta Innovates–Technology Futures (AITF) CSI model, a history match was obtained for CSI Cycle 1. Eleven different potential injection/production strategies were then evaluated for Cycle 2 and the simulation results were used in the design of this cycle. One conclusion was that expanding the solvent injection period from 1 to 2 months increased the combined oil production for the three wells by 29% but resulted in a 46% increase in net solvent to oil ratio.
Figure 1

Conversion from post-CHOPS radial geometry to Cartesian geometry for CSI simulations

Figure 1

Conversion from post-CHOPS radial geometry to Cartesian geometry for CSI simulations

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