1. Eleven responses were received to the survey questionnaire, of which nine contained data sufficiently complete for comparative analysis. One responding company reported less than ten engineering employees; one fell in the category of 10–20 engineering employees one in the 40–50 range of engineering employees; one in the range of 100–120; two in the range of 300–500; and three in the range of 600 or more.

  2. Table 1 shows the five year summary of all respondents for total engineers employed at year end; degreed petroleum engineers employed at year end; total number of engineering hires during the year from universities; total number of degreed petroleum engineering hires during the year from universities; and total number of engineering hires during the year from sources other than the campuses.

  3. The high year for engineering employment was 1984, not only for all engineers but also for degreed petroleum engineers. In the 1984–1987 interval, employment of all engineers dropped 21.2% and employment of degreed petroleum engineers dropped 17.3%. The percentage of petroleum engineers in the total engineering work percentage of petroleum engineers in the total engineering work force increased from 62 to 65 over the five year period 1983 to 1987.

  4. These companies hired from the universities at the lowest level in 1986, both for engineers in general and for degreed petroleum engineers. The 1986 hirings were below the average for petroleum engineers. The 1986 hirings were below the average for the other four years by 36% for all engineers and by 32% for degreed petroleum engineers. Over the five year period, 392 engineers were hired from the campuses and 62 from other sources, for a total of 454 total hires. The percentage of non-campus hires was 13.7%. Of those engineers hired from the campuses over the five year reporting period, 335 (85.5%) were degreed petroleum engineers.

  5. Projections for the future five years by these companies indicate a slow growth in the number of employed engineers at year end. The low projections are for an engineering pool in 1992 that is 3.5% above that at year end 1987; the high projections are for an engineering pool in 1992 that is 7.0% over that at year end 1987. Both the high and low projections indicate that the minimum year end employment level will have projections indicate that the minimum year end employment level will have occurred in 1987.

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