This paper was prepared for the 47th Annual Fall Meeting of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of AIME, to be held in San, Antonio, Tex., Oct. 8–11, 1972 Permission to copy is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words. Illustrations may not be copied. The abstract should contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL paper is presented. Publication elsewhere after publication in the JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY or the SOCIETY OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERS JOURNAL is usually granted upon requested to the Editor of the appropriate journal, provided agreement to give proper credit is made. provided agreement to give proper credit is made. Discussion of this paper is invited. Three copies of any discussion should be sent to the Society of Petroleum Engineers Office. Such discussions may be presented at the above meeting and, with the paper, may be considered for publication in one of the two SPE magazines.

Abstract

To obtain accurate data for use in calculating vertical fluid flow within a reservoir, in situ measurements of vertical permeability were conducted on five wells in the South Swan Hills Unit. These measurements quantified the permeability parameters for subsequent model permeability parameters for subsequent model studies of the Light Brown member of the Beaverhill Lake formation.

This paper presents a description of the data collection technique employed and the results for the vertical permeability measurements.

Included in the discussion is a treatment of the data analysis for a single measurement utilizing:

  1. the two techniques presently available in literature and a variable rate pressure matching procedure.

Based on pressure matching procedure. Based on the data obtained and the results of the testing as discussed in this paper, it can be concluded that a viable technique is available for measuring vertical permeability. Additional refinements in permeability. Additional refinements in the field operations associated with this type of pressure testings,, can be made, but overall a success ratio of 100% should not be expected.

The successful application of this type of measurement to relating core analysis data to the needs of an adequate reservoir description should be of interest to any performance study.

Introduction

Every reservoir engineer has probably recognized that the single, most probably recognized that the single, most important contributing factor to a useful simulation is the description of the reservoir being studied. The reservoir description must include permeability values which, will govern the fluid flow within the model. These-data are generally obtained from core analysis and may be tailored to reflect information available from pressure transient testing of producing or injection wells. In the case producing or injection wells. In the case of three dimensional or two dimensional cross sectional studies the vertical as well as the horizontal permeability must be quantified.

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