Abstract

The paper presents evaluation of passive ultrasonic logging tool deployed using E-line to assess casing integrity in 3 oil producing wells in South of Oman. In addition a comparison is offered between the ultrasound logging technology and a more conventional well integrity test using a hoist and multi-set plug that has been utilized to date.

The ultrasonic log was run in a selection of oil producing wells, operated by beam pump. Those wells were confirmed as having well integrity issues from well surveillance data and were causing significant oil deferment (2.2% of total oil production). Those wells have a history of cementation challenges owning to heavy losses that occur within a water bearing zone located above the pay zone. This, combined with the presence of H2S and oxygenated water at this depth, has resulted in a number of corrosion related integrity issues across the field.

The logging program was originally planned inside tubing with surface pressures of 1,800 psi but it was decided to log inside casing (without tubing) because leak was more severe than predicted (1 m3/min of leak rate). In wells A and B, leak points at 630 m and 225 m were identified and respectively verified. However, another leaking interval in well A was also identified from conventional WIT using hoist. In well C, no pressure held on surface causing lack of differential across leak which resulted in identification failure on first attempt (inside tubing). On second attempt (inside casing), unclear ultrasound reading was attained but seven leak points still can be identified after several log passes. The tool can save significant hoist time and will become viable alternative.

In conclusion this paper illustrates examples of where the ultrasonic log has provided highly accurate leak detection, significant time saving and improvements in overall operating efficiency. The limits of the technology are also discussed with recommendations provided for the application of the service based on operational experience gained during the technical evaluation.

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