ABSTRACT

Nuclear power plant operators are chartered to provide safe, reliable, and cost-effective electricity to millions of homes. The reliability and long-term viability of nuclear plants as infrastructure investments is supported by numerous corrosion management programs, tools, and systems to meet this challenge after 20, 30, and even 40 years or more of sustained operation.

This paper highlights plant processes and systems where these programs are leveraged, driving corrosion and integrity concerns, inspection and monitoring plans, trending and forecasting tools, and long-term asset integrity investment considerations. This paper also presents continuous improvement opportunities for operators, service providers, consultants, and organizations seeking to meet long-term asset integrity management challenges for this vital component of our electric infrastructure.

Perspectives from multiple operating plants will be reviewed in this paper. This information will be relevant to other power plants or facilities with complex balance of plant infrastructures supporting heating, cooling, fueling, and related industrial operations and infrastructure.

INTRODUCTION

Exelon Generation presents an overview of corrosion, long-term asset integrity management needs, and strategies for an operating fleet of nuclear power plants, featuring multiple systems, corrosion threats, and integrity management programs. This paper provides an overview of balance of plant (i.e., beyond a plant’s condensate, feed water, and steam cycle) operations and corrosion risks as described within industry commitments, expectations, and best practices for corrosion management.

To anticipate and meet these challenges, the industry has developed a range of systematic inspection and monitoring plans, trending and forecasting tools, and long-term asset integrity strategies. Due to stringent public safety expectations and low operating margins, the industry considers innovative applications of proven technologies to maximize benefits for low-risk solutions. However, continually extending service life while addressing obsolescence, security threats, and other competitive energy initiatives that drive the industry to consider and pioneer innovations, as well.

All of these efforts are identified and undertaken by a small, but competitive community of nuclear operating companies and service providers. Collaboration between companies provides solutions and survivability, but business and engineering innovations provide performance differentiators fleet-to-fleet and site-to-site. This paper concludes with continuous improvement opportunities for operators, service providers, and consultants seeking to meet long-term asset integrity management challenges for this vital segment of our zero-carbon emission electricity infrastructure with an eye towards a sustainable future.

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