INTRODUCTION

ABSTRACT:

Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transportation, and storage may be considered as a short- to medium-term solution to reduce green house emission while carbon-neutral energy technologies are developed. Several pilot plants have been built in recent years to demonstrate carbon capture and storage, to learn and to optimize facilities and related processes. Extensive industrial experience is already available in CO2 pipelines for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, but further experience is needed for transporting CO2 in presence of impurities resulting from some capture processes. With all these developments, carbon capture, transportation, and storage (CCS) infrastructure is becoming increasingly possible. The CO2 captured from various sources may contain many impurities depending on the process and capture technology. Currently there is little knowledge of the effect of impurities on material properties under CCS operating conditions. This paper identifies some key material issues, discusses current R&D being carried out to address them, and proposes a method to perform coordinated R&D to produce useful corrosion rate information to aid in the material selection CCS network.

The progress of civilization over the past two centuries has significantly depended on the availability and utilization of energy resources. Our dependency on energy is anticipated to increase; with the total global energy demand in 2030 projected to be 50-60% above the current rate of consumption. While energy from nuclear and renewable sources is projected to increase substantially, the dominant source of energy, at approximately 80% of the total, is and will continue to be fossil fuels (Table 1)1. This is particularly important given that fossil fuels are the primary source of anthropogenic CO2. Therefore, the capture, transportation, and storage of CO2 from the combustion of fossil fuels present an interim opportunity to achieve a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

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