The design of a naval vessel requires accurate estimation of the extreme loads and motions that it will experience during its lifetime. Operation in large seaways in which the ship-wave interaction is highly nonlinear and transient leads to design events such as maximum internal loads due to global wave bending, local slamming loads, extreme roll, combinations of the global wave bending and local slamming, and many others. In this article, a method is presented that allows for nonlinear analysis to be used to predict events with user-specified rareness. The core of the method combines probability, frequency, and time-domain analyses to generate short time-window sea environments that lead to extreme dynamical events. The Office of Naval Research Tumblehome geometry is analyzed for the extreme roll angle when advancing in stern quartering irregular seas.

1. Introduction

The design of a naval vessel requires accurate estimation of extreme loads and motions that it will experience during its lifetime. Specific quantities of interest are the maximum slamming load during wet-deck impact, maximum acceleration at different locations on the vessel, maximum green-water load on the bow structure or helicopter deck, maximum roll angle, or frequency of occurrence of capsize, to name a few. It is important to recognize that a ship lifetime is decades long, and the exposure time in different severe storms over the lifetime is of the order of weeks, if not months. Furthermore, because of the random nature of the sea and, hence, the dynamical response of the ship, the extreme response is also random and should be characterized statistically. This means that a single lifetime realization in a given seaway by either model tests or numerical simulation only gives one sample of the extreme response, and multiple lifetime realizations are required to characterize the extreme response.

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