Abstract

Mechanical rock breaking methods have been used since a long time in many activities within both mining industries and civil industries. One of cutting tools that are used on mechanical excavation equipment is a drag pick. This research paper will discuss mechanical rock breakage using drag pick as an extension of former research that is similar to present study that used a small scale cuttability test machine with 0,5 cm depth of cutting and 1,5 cm width of cutting tools conducted by Novandika (2014) and a full-scale cuttability test machine with 4 cm depth of cutting and 3,68 cm width of cutting tools conducted by Paranindya (2015) and Perdana (2015). The authors conduct the physical test and numerical modelling for both small-scale and full-scale laboratory cuttability test to assess the result from the small-scale cuttability test. Specifically, numerical modelling with the finite element method in Rocscience 3 (RS 3) is conducted to visualize rock breakage mechanism with drag pick.

1. Introduction

One type of mining methods that has been developed as technology improves is continuous mining. Bucket Wheel Excavator, Surface miner in open pit mine and roadheader in underground mine are unconventional excavating machines commonly used for continuous mining. Cutting tools on such kind of machines generally include the drag tool to do mechanical breakage and its performance can be predicted through the cuttability test in laboratory.

The cuttability test for some kind of rocks can be analyzed based on cutting force (Fc) and specific energy (S.E) data. Roxborough (1987) explains that an engineer can choose the size and type of the cutting machine due the inability to adjust insitu rock formation that will be faced during the excavation. It is clear that the most affecting factor for the cuttability is not the machine, but the rock mass itself, so an assessment on rock properties and some rock mass influences for cuttability should be of concern to researchers.

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