ABSTRACT:

A field test was conducted in the 1200m deep Kristineberg mine in northern Sweden to test the feasibility and usefulness using a laser scanner and a 3D imaging system to measure the shape changes in the mining stopes approximately 5m wide 7m in height and over a length of about 11 metres. The deviations using the laser scanner were 5mm and for the 3D imaging system 10 mm, expressed as Root Mean Square (RMS) of the overall error vector in space. Both methods are useful in showing the overall deformation pattern of the entire surfaces of the mining stope. These trends will be useful for increasing the understanding of the rock and ground support response in a mining stope.

1 INTRODUCTION

Ground support has significant impact on safety and tunnelling/development advance rate both in mining as well as for civil engineering applications. Improvement in technology is paramount to higher advance rates, lower costs and increased operational safety. There is a lack of data on how ground support behaves in combination with the rock; more data of the correct type will contribute to increased understanding of the interactions. This paper describes the results from a field test in the 1200m deep Kristineberg mine in northern Sweden (Krauland et al. 2001) to test the feasibility and usefulness using a laser scanner and 3D imaging to measure the shape changes in the mining stopes. Plenty of publications exist within the scope of geological mapping based on images (Gaich et al. 2006) but the authors are not aware on the application of photogrammetry as within this project for shape deformation detection and its visualisation over the entire area of underground excavations. The results were compared with the results obtained from geodetic measurements using a total station. The tests were conducted in spring 2009.

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