ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT:

Extensive infrastructure development in the Chalk of the Anglo-Paris basin has highlighted the requirement for a comprehensive understanding of both the short and long-term behaviour of the material. Whilst the short-term strength and deformation properties are relatively well reported, there remains little guidance in terms of the long-term response of the material. This paper presents the results of a long-term stress path testing programme on intact homogeneous samples of low to medium density chalk. Data was collected over periods of continuous loading in excess of 450 days, from which the long-term or creep response of the material can be assessed. parameters of the chalk and the influence of the stress path on the creep response.

1 INTRODUCTION

During the geotechnical design and construction of large civil engineering projects, it is not always possible to evaluate the long-term stress-strain response or creep aspects of the ground within the time frame of the design and construction programme. Consequently, prediction of the long-term response of the structure must be assessed from the extrapolation of data obtained from relatively shortterm testing programmes (of the order of a few months) or based on generic relationships which may not reflect accurately the rhelogical characteristics of the materials encountered at the site. In recent years extensive infrastructure development has taken place in the Chalk of the Anglo-Paris basin, and significant projects are planned for the near future. Consequently there remains a requirement for a comprehensive understanding of both the short and long-term behaviour of the Chalk. The short-term strength and deformation properties are reasonable well reported in the literature, see for example, Millar (2002), Kageson-Loe et al. (1994), Mortimore & Fielding (1990), and guidance for design can be found in the CIRIA (2002) guide.

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